Living with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (Asperger's Disorder) as an adult female.

Dilapidated

autisticaplanet:

I need to look into lo-fi. I have seen photos with this effect & am interested.

Originally posted on Broken Light: A Photography Collective:

Photo taken by contributor Ty Fitzgerald, a man who has been diagnosed with Bipolar II. Ty has a fondness for Lo-fi and Lux filters because they intensify shadows, highlights and colors. Such photos visually represent the way he sees the world, a little brighter and darker than he imagines those without bipolar disorder see the world.

About this photo: “This photograph of a dilapidated building is another example of how I love to photograph beaten down and broken things. I think it shows the effects of time and is testament to the inevitability of our demise.

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autisticaplanet:

Serene and surreal photo. I love variations on everyday things.

Originally posted on Broken Light: A Photography Collective:

Photo taken by contributor Leya, a single mother working in the mental health field. Leya has a child with multiple barriers, including severe anxiety. She also grew up in a highly anxious household with a family that experienced significant historical trauma. Leya believes that the key to our collective functioning is finding ways to calm our overactive minds. For her, that includes walks in nature, photography, poetry, painting, cooking, dance and yoga. She primarily photographs nature and historic sites that grab her and convey a story of emotion or sheer beauty.

About this photo: “This photo was taken on the Island of Hawaii. The volcano symbolizes destruction and rebirth, and this aftermath is strangely beautiful. The sky is still blue, the land will heal, and there is always hope for a new day.”

Find more from Leya at her blog.

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**Visit Broken Light’s main gallery here ▸ Now a…

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autisticaplanet:

Serene and surreal photo. I love variations on everyday things.

Originally posted on Broken Light: A Photography Collective:

Photo taken by contributor Leya, a single mother working in the mental health field. Leya has a child with multiple barriers, including severe anxiety. She also grew up in a highly anxious household with a family that experienced significant historical trauma. Leya believes that the key to our collective functioning is finding ways to calm our overactive minds. For her, that includes walks in nature, photography, poetry, painting, cooking, dance and yoga. She primarily photographs nature and historic sites that grab her and convey a story of emotion or sheer beauty.

About this photo: “This photo was taken on the Island of Hawaii. The volcano symbolizes destruction and rebirth, and this aftermath is strangely beautiful. The sky is still blue, the land will heal, and there is always hope for a new day.”

Find more from Leya at her blog.

_____

**Visit Broken Light’s main gallery here ▸ Now a…

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Originally posted on Everyday Asperger's:

across time

Across Time by Samantha Craft

grace

Grace by Samantha Craft

I am painting again. :) Watercolor and paper towels.

Photo on 2-7-15 at 1.53 PM

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Originally posted on Broken Light: A Photography Collective:

Photo taken by contributor Daniel, a man in his forties of Puerto Rican decent who currently lives in Burlington, New Jersey. He was diagnosed with bipolar II disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and insomnia in 2007, but had been suffering for at least ten years before that. Photography has been his primary method of coping since he was a teen. He feels that the photos he takes have meaning and help him on his journey.

About this photo: “This was taken in Bordentown, NJ. As we walked, this enclosed  porch blew me away with all the knick-knacks. It gave me a very warm and cozy feeling. It was like seeing all of the good memories you’ve ever had on display.”

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**Visit Broken Light’s main gallery here ▸ Now a 501(c)3 non-profit! Please donate here.

*Facebook & Twitter @BrokenLighCo & @DanielleHark. Follow for e-mail notifications.

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autisticaplanet:

Awesome, telling and different!

Originally posted on Broken Light: A Photography Collective:

Please welcome first-time contributor Savannah Condon, a 19-year-old traveling photographer who is currently residing in Seattle, WA. Savannah suffers from cyclomythia and depression. She has been on and off of various medications since she was 13. Savannah has had a passion for photography and art since she was very young, which makes it the perfect therapeutic tool for her. She especially loves creating self-portraits because she has difficulty explaining her feelings with words. Her self-portraits are raw expressions of feelings that she, along with many other people, experience on a regular basis.

About this photo: “Many of you may have heard the saying ‘digging yourself a deeper hole.’ At this moment in time, every action I made seemed to backfire. I couldn’t do anything right-I felt like I was self-sabatoging myself. My impulsive decisions were getting worse and more stupid.  I felt out of control.  Which was terrifying. I was my biggest problem and I was…

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The Art of Miscommunication

P1070500

All week I wait. Sunday through Thursday I am alone. No people nor pets. TV and occasional house chores primarily preoccupy my time. I can’t get out to take pictures with a record cold February, so I have taken up beading. While I appreciate my alone time, I also equally appreciate the short pocket of communication time I get from the family member I live with after their workday. Finally, the big day arrives, Friday. A day when either I have a doctor appointment or it is warmer weather and I can go walking and take pictures with them. These Fridays do not happen every week.  Sometimes we are just around the house. I think it is quite reasonable for me to want to relate to them for at least an hour minimum.

I think it is also quite reasonable to expect that during the joint watching of “Wallace and Grommit” there will be no electronic or non-electronic vices. Imagine how devalued I feel when I am speaking to someone I assume is listening to me when in fact I turn to see them scrolling on their smart phone or knitting, counting stitches as I speak. Multitasking is more important to this individual than having a conversation with me.

I even asked this person if they took their knitting tools to their friend’s house. They said no, they did not. That says a lot to me about their priorities. I obviously do not rank high on the list. I get that I am not the most interesting person on planet earth, but I think I rank above inanimate objects.

My mother died almost a year ago. We were constant companions. She did not come from an era of electronic communication. Like me, she wasn’t social, but she did both want and give basic communication with her family. Even when we weren’t talking or in the same room, she said we had what she called “compatible silence”. This meant we had a shared feeling of mutuality and love. I can’t find any of that with my TV. I certainly can’t find any of that with a person glued to a gadget.

I am not super social. I have autism spectrum disorder. Communication for me is a dream most of the time, at least the going below the surface part. I think most humans do want to relate to another human part of the time. Even a wallflower can wither.

I know when I endure social deprivation and devaluation when with a multitasker, my anxiety and depression increases. So does my stimming and obsessive-compulsive behavior. Science has proven that those who do not socialize have more health problems and don’t live as long. That last part being of  some consultation, at least.

This is what autism looks like after the child has grown up and the parents are gone, unless someone, somewhere does something to change things. Socialization, sensory inclusion, the basic need to feel loved and give love (no matter how clumsily). If I cannot help myself and nobody else does what I can’t, another adult from the next generation will face the same or similar things I face now. Don’t you want better for the autistic person in your life (maybe that’s you)?

Update: Due to being a little older and better experienced living with an autistic adult, my family member was able to initiate a real-time conversation the following day, acknowledging the multi-tasking and reassuring me that this person did want to continue a relationship with me. We were able to make amends and continue on with life. I was able to voice my concerns in my time and wrote a follow-up letter to communicate what I could not in real time.

A feature I have read about mostly females with ASD (Asperger’s in particular), is that they have a very hard time recovering from emotional upheaval. It is like having PTSD. I relive the incident and obsess on it. I was relieved to be given permission to move on. A weight was literally lifted off of me.

“Let every man be swift to hear, slow to speak and slow to wrath; for the wrath of man does not promote the righteousness of God.” James 1:19-20 NKJV

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